Updates to SeedStar Mobile

Deere Seedstar Mobile for Ipad

by Josh Zuck, Lanark, IL 

Hope all is going well with this year’s planting season.  Last year John Deere introduced SeedStar Mobile with the ExactEmerge planters.  Retrofit kits are available for 2011 and newer 1770NT and 1790 planters.   SeedStar Mobile gives producers easy access to their planting data and provides the mobility they need to view the data at any time or place.

Flow of Planting Data

Flow of Planting Data

Last year the key function was high performance seed monitoring on your iPad to easily spot performance issues on a per row basis.

seedstar_mobile_model_1

SeedStar Mobile High Performance Seed Monitor

This year Deere improved the app greatly!  You can now view previously planted fields.

SeedStar Mobile Home Screen

SeedStar Mobile Home Screen

To do so, select the menu, then select field review.

IMG_0483

Field Review Selection Screen

You can then pick the field you would like to scout and review the “as planted” map.  You can view planting data as a map overlay relating to:

  • Actual population
  • Target population
  • Singulation
  • Seed spacing CV
  • Ride quality
  • Applied downforce
  • Gauge wheel margin
  • Ground speed
  • Variety

Field Review provides the grower the ability to perform basic crop scouting activities after the crop has emerged.  As long as you have an iPad with GPS you will see a little blue dot in the field for your current location.

field_review_1

Variety Map

You can then walk to the trouble area or hybrid change and see what issue you may have had or to see how that hybrid is performing.  The data can also be uploaded to MyJohnDeere operation center to view from your home.

Seedstar Mobile also allows you to remotely monitor planter performance in real time within the John Deere Operations Center.   Remote monitoring helps the grower or manager ensure the planter is performing properly without having to be at the field or inside the tractor cab.

If you are interested in purchasing SeedStar mobile or have more questions on it, please contact any of our 20 Sloan Implement locations.

Sloan Support is written by the product support team at Sloan Implement, a 20 location John Deere dealer in Illinois and Wisconsin.  Learn more at www.sloans.com

Switching the Planter to Soybeans

by Lucas Veale, Assumption, IL 

We get a lot of questions about switching the planter from corn to beans, and for good reason.  Sometimes it is pretty simple, but for other models and monitors it is not quite so easy.

In a John Deere Vac planter with a Pro-Max 40 disk, obviously you will need to change the disk from the 40 cell corn disk to the 108 cell soybean disk.  You will also need to change the “knocker” wheel in the black meter vacuum chamber door to the “wiper.”  If you have a mini hopper planter you will also need to change the short brush with the “double stair step” to the brush with the “single stair step.”  The long step will go towards the outer radius of the meter.  The short step will be towards the inner hub of the meter.  Make sure you don’t install backwards.  Vac level settings should be around 8” of H20.  You will need to use talc in central fill planter even with beans.  If the beans are treated, you will need to use about the same rate of talc as what is used in corn.  Untreated beans can usually have the talc rate cut in half from corn.  If it is a warm humid day, take extra care to use plenty of talc and make sure it is well mixed in the hopper with the seed.

If you have a planter with a variable rate hydraulic seed drive then you will need to go into the section in the monitor where you enter the target rates and change the selected disk to “soybean.”  Failure to do this will result in an extreme overplant condition.  Keep in mind that the high rate sensors on many planters 10 or more years old will not count every bean, especially in a 30” row.  They can be 5-10% lower than the actual depending on a lot of factors.  Even the newer accu-count sensors may show slightly lower that the expected.  If the monitor is showing lower than expected, double check the beans per foot in the seed trench to verify that you are getting the correct population.

In an Exactemerge planter, you will need to use the 64 cell soybean bowl.  The “rumble strip” at the lower radius of the meter housing will need to be changed to the smooth unit.  Next, the double eliminator will need to be lowered to extreme lower setting line.  This will be well below the 3 corn setting lines.  Don’t forget to change the selected disk in the seed setup portion of the monitor to the soybean bowl and select your target population.

If your planter is a 1790 split row planter there are a couple more items to check.  In the monitor under the seed setup where you put in your target population, you will need to select the number of rows for beans.  If you have a 16/31 planter for example it will show a 16 or a 31 with a box.  Select the 31 and the monitor will change your row spacing and turn on the additional seed sensors automatically. If you have a 350 monitor you should only need to change the “Split” button and the monitor will change the row spacing and turn on the other sensors automatically.  Don’t forget to let down your back rows off of the stops so they will engage the ground at the proper depth as well.

You view more information on the Deere seed meter on this video:

Good luck throughout the rest of the spring planting season.

Sloan Support is written by the product support team at Sloan Implement, a 20 location John Deere dealer in Illinois and Wisconsin.   Learn more at www.sloans.com

 

Pneumatic Closing Wheels from John Deere

by Josh Zuck, Lanark, IL 

In mid-January, John Deere introduced pneumatic closing available for the 2016 planting season.  As of now, these will only fit 2016 ExactEmerge planters.  Deere plans to add more models to the lineup in 2017.

Adjustments are made from the cab on your 2630 display. You can preset up to 20 different settings based on your ground conditions.  With the manual adjust closing wheels, it can take up to 5 min to adjust a 24 row planter.  With the pneumatic, that time can be taken down to 10 seconds.  Adjustments can be made on the fly with the press of a button.  The pneumatic closing wheels will be able to be set up in 2 sections.  Recommendations are center 4 rows as 1 sections, then the outer 10 rows on each wing as a 2nd section.  This will allow you to put more pressure on the center where the weight is carried and should help to close the seed trench.  There is also a pressure feedback sensor to let you know how the closing wheels are  performing.

Pneumatic Closing Wheel

Pneumatic Closing Wheel

Why pneumatic closing wheels? One advantage is more uniform emergence.  Uniform emergence is a 10 to 18 bu / acre factor. There is also 76% less variance in closing the trench than manual adjust.  You can now take control over your ground conditions even more. Contact any of our Sloan Implement locations for more info.

Sloan Support is written by the product support team at Sloan Implement, a 20 location John Deere dealer in Illinois and Wisconsin.  Learn more at www.sloans.com

The Importance of Good Data

by Lucas Veale, Assumption, IL 

Greetings from Sloan Implement Company!  I hope everyone enjoyed great food and family time over Thanksgiving.  I am looking forward to more of the same as Christmas quickly approaches

Warmer than normal weather has been the rule this fall in our area.  A great deal of NH3 was applied, but there will definitely be some spring application needs as well.

Let me ask each of you if you had an autotrac system 10 years ago in 2005?  What about 5 years ago?  I bet the answer to the first question would be that very few had a system in ’05.  I would venture to say that many, or more likely, most of you had at least 1 system in 2010.  The question for most producers today would not be if you had a system, but rather how many systems you currently have in your operation? I pose these questions to shine a light on how fast technology is changing and how much of an impact it has on you and your business.

If autotrac was the first big use of GPS technology, section control or auto swath is definitely a close second. So what is number 3?  Any guesses?  It is a hot topic in nearly every farm publication or Ag website.  The answer is data.  Not just data, but GOOD data!  Inaccurate data is not much better than no data at all.

So how does good data have an impact like autotrac or section control?  Good data is the inside information you need to help you make informed decisions about every acre within your operation.  All of you know that there are productive and not-as-productive areas in each of your fields.  But the question is not just how productive or not-so-productive, but how big is the good area and where and how much does it change as you move out of the highly productive area?  Even better, why does it change?  Can we fix it? Is there something holding back the sweet spots from getting even better?  The list could go on and on.  Treating every acre of the field the same, or flat rate application, of seed, fertilizer, nitrogen, lime, etc. does not make agronomic sense, especially in these economic times. Knowing what each acre is putting in your pocket will be of paramount importance going forward.

I will admit that the amount of information that can be gleaned from yield maps, soil tests, application data, etc. is mind boggling and can be intimidating.  The question you are probably asking, is how do I know when, where, and how much change to make?  The only way to answer this question is to have a good “data bank” of past history from each field.  This can then be used by you or a trusted advisor to guide your decisions. As with anything of value, good data takes time and effort to collect.  The good news is that nearly every combine/planter/application tool built within the last 10+ years has the ability to collect the data you need to build your data bank.  The even better news is that most customers already have the majority of the equipment they need to complete these tasks!

Another storm on the horizon is the political climate (pun intended!) in Washington.  As fewer folks in the general population actually understand production agriculture, greater imposition on your use of commercial fertilizers, chemicals, etc. will be the focus of many state houses and in Washington.  Has anyone seen a news story about the algae bloom in the Gulf as an example? The ability to show, on an acre by acre basis, how accurately and efficiently you use inputs will be extremely valuable, if and when the rules change.

So where do we go from here?  Make a point to start or continue to collect good data from this point forward!  Calibrate and post calibrate your combine yield monitor, record your as-applied planting rates and varieties, and obtain the as-applied fertilizer maps from your ASP (Ag Service Provider).  All of this needs to be in an electronic format so it can be used later on.  Find someone to help you clean up your data if you are not able or willing to do it yourself.  Sloan Implement offers a basic data service that allows you to begin to collect GOOD data without even owning a computer, all while using the GPS equipment you already own.  You can see more info on Sloan’s Data Management service here.  John Deere has a website, www.myjohndeere.com, where you can store and view the data as well from any smart phone or tablet and share it with only those you choose.  Finally, find a trusted advisor to help you interpret the data and help you make informed decisions.

In conclusion, even if you think you are not ready for all of this, start collecting good data now!  Remember my questions at the beginning of the article?  How many of you had an autotrac system 10 or even 5 years ago?  The difference now is that you could get into an autotrac system whenever you made the decision to do so.  Collecting data takes time.  You have seen how fast the last 10 years has changed.  Imagine what the next 5 or 10 years has in store.
Sloan Support is written by the product support team at Sloan Implement, a 20 location John Deere dealer in Illinois and Wisconsin.   Learn more at www.sloans.com

 

Wisconsin Planting, Exact-Emergence, W260 Windrower & 500R Platform

W260 & 500R cutting Alfalfa

by Joe Brunker, Monroe, WI 

It’s still pretty busy in Southern Wisconsin.  With all of the cool and wet weather over the last few weeks, some guys are just now finishing up corn and beans. Others are busy spraying, cutting down rye. or making hay. Some sidedressing has started as well. Most of the corn in the area is getting a little yellow from the dampness and nights still in the 30’s. Today’s sun and heat is just what it needs.

The ExactEmerge stands look very good. We walked some fields and talked to customers today. Overall they are very happy. The singulation and spacing is very good. The planters that we checked also had sectional control dialed in nearly perfect.

ExactEmerge Section Control

ExactEmerge Section Control

Exactemerge Spacing

Exactemerge Spacing

We have cut some rye and alfalfa with the new W260 windrower and new 500R platform with Tri-Lobe conditioning rolls. The W260 has a 6.8L engine that with 260 engine horsepower at 2400 rpm and up to 285 horsepower at the power bulge. The windrower didn’t bog down at all in tall, wet, and sometimes lodged rye, all while going a constant 12 mph across the field. Meanwhile, a competitor’s windrower couldn’t get over 6.5 mph in the same field. The W260 seems to be a great fit for heavy crops and/or hills. The new 500R platform was making a very nice and even windrow in both rye and alfalfa. The 500R includes a new overshot cross auger that delivers increased performance in windrow formation and cut quality. Crop flow is also improved because of the auger and additional converging drums that are taller and closer together on each end of the platform to provide an even flow into the conditioner while reducing bunching, recutting and wrapping on the ends.

W260 500R Rye

W260 & 500R Cutting Rye

500R converging drums overshot auger and tri-lobes

500R converging drums overshot auger and tri-lobes

Sloan Support is written by the product support team at Sloan Implement, a 19 location John Deere dealer in Illinois and Wisconsin.  Learn more at www.sloans.com

Planter Monitor Shows Low Population in Soybeans?

4066R ATU RTK Research Plot Sprayer Tractor

by Lucas Veale, Assumption, IL 

If you are seeing several rows or your average population is running low in soybeans, here are a couple things to keep in mind.  It is normal for the planter to read slightly low in soybeans, especially in 30″ rows.  The amount of soybeans passing the seed sensor is very high.  If you are experiencing this symptom, verify the actual planted population is correct by digging some seed in a few random rows.  17’5″ is 1/1000 of an acre for 1 row on 30″.  Multiply the amount of seed in this distance by 1000 will give you your population for that row.  Check a few rows to verify.  Another thing we have noticed this year is that if you have not brushed your seed tubes before switching to beans you could experience this symptom.  Talc and seed treatment can build up from corn planting and can impair the ability of the sensor to accurately count seed.  Finally, make sure that you are using talc in the central fill planters with beans.  This is especially true if using a treated bean or delivery tube plugging can occur.  Remember that it is just as important to properly mix the talc as it is to use the proper amount.

 

JD 4020 AutoTrac Planting Soybeans

Here’s a video of Larry Probst, store manager at Sloan Implement in Effingham, IL, planting soybeans with his Autotrac ready 4020 and 7000 12 row planter.

Sloan Support is written by the product support team at Sloan Implement, a 19 location John Deere dealer in Illinois and Wisconsin.   Learn more at www.sloans.com